Posted: Sun., Feb. 16, 2003, 6:00am PT

Globe-trotting
By ROBERT HOFLER

NEW YORK — The company of Shakespeare’s Globe leaves London to make its first full U.S. tour this fall. The troupe will be visiting American shores for two months.

Under the direction of Tim Carroll, the gender-bending staging of the Bard’s romantic comedy opened last year at London’s Middle Temple Hall, the venue of the play’s first recorded staging in 1602. The Globe’s artistic director, Mark Rylance, played Olivia, a role he will reprise Stateside.

Under the direction of Tim Carroll, the gender-bending staging of the Bard’s romantic comedy opened last year at London’s Middle Temple Hall, the venue of the play’s first recorded staging in 1602. The Globe’s artistic director, Mark Rylance, played Olivia, a role he will reprise Stateside.

In keeping with the Globe’s authentic presentation of Shakespeare, 2Luck Concepts is looking for U.S. venues that can replicate the footprint of Middle Temple Hall with its extended thrust stage.

At present, the Freud Theater on the campus of UCLA is the only traditional theater booked to present the production.

“But the auditorium is not being used,” Luckacovic says. “The audience fits on risers on the stage of the Freud.” Duplicating the design of Middle Temple Hall limits seating to between 300 and 500.

Chicago’s Shakespeare Theater will present the production at Navy Pier. A ballroom will be used on the campus of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. And the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis is currently looking at everything from high school gymnasiums to a cave on the bank of the Mississippi River. Other cities on the tour include Pittsburgh and Philadelphia.

Despite a rave review from Ben Brantley in the New York Times, the Globe’s production of “Twelfth Night” is not yet booked for Gotham. (The company was seen at the Brooklyn Academy of Music last season in “Cymbeline.”)

Open weeks in the tour are early October and mid-December, not the ideal time for optimum box office.

“In many ways, we’re not in the commercial world but rather the performing arts-center world, with venues that are more attuned to risky undertakings,” Luckacovic says. “We are producing the tour, but finding the venues that will pay for it.”

The tour of the 33-member company is capitalized at around $140,000 a week.

Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, a replica of the original Globe, was the vision of American actor-producer Sam Wanamaker, who died in 1993. The company and its new venue opened four years later, and has toured Germany and Japan.

As for the new 2Luck Concepts, Luckacovic was formerly a vice president of CAMI. Oldham had been an agent with ICM in Europe.